Fibromuscular dysplasia

Also known as

  • FMD

Fibromuscular dysplasia, often abbreviated as FMD, is a non-atherosclerotic, non-inflammatory disease of the blood vessels that causes abnormal growth within the wall of an artery.

Condition details

In some cases if not managed properly FMD-related aneurysms can occur causing bleeding into the brain, resulting in stroke, permanent nerve damage, or death. Shedding light in the importance of detection and seeking appropriate care in reference to outcomes. What we do know is patients with medial fibroplasia generally have a favorable prognosis. However, those who present with FMD in multiple vascular beds, or intimal disease involving multiple branches of the renal arteries may develop renal artery dissection[10] or progressive renal impairment. Therefore having a more difficult and complex prognostic course

I would like to edit or add detail to this database entry

Photos of affected individuals

Click images to enlarge.

  • No baby imageBaby
  • No toddler imageToddler
  • No child 4-10 imageChild 4-10
  • No child 10-18 imageChild 10-18
  • No adult imageAdult

Typical age range of first manifestation

  • Does not manifest in Baby
  • Does not manifest in Toddler
  • Does not manifest in Child 4-10
  • Does not manifest in Child 10-18
  • Can manifest in Adult

Symptoms

Affected genes identified to date

Inheritance patterns

Are carriers affected?

How many are affected?

Support groups and organisations

No groups found

Known experts

No experts found

I would like to edit or add detail to this database entry

Please let us know more about you

In order to allow you to edit this form, please fill in the fields below and click submit to proceed to to the editing page.

used only if we have questions about your entry.

Share this page

Welcome to the GDUK network

If this is the first time you have searched for information on a particular condition, details you find here may be distressing.

» If you would rather read our Newly Diagnosed section for parents and carers first click here